Vitamin C Cuts Sugar Cravings

  • 16 Jun 2020
  • Reading time 2 mins
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‘Since taking vitamin C regularly my sugar craving has gone. Could this be connected?’ The simple answer is yes.

Vitamin C is not only made (in animals) directly from sugar (glucose) but it shares the same transport system into the blood so, in that sense, it competes with sugar. That’s why I don't like sweet vitamin C supplements. But it goes deeper than this. Studies have shown that vitamin C status is inversely related to weight.1. Individuals with adequate vitamin C status burn 30% more fat during a moderate exercise bout than individuals with low vitamin C status; thus, vitamin C depleted individuals may be more resistant to losing unwanted fat.2

In my opinion the main reason why twice as many men are dying from the virus than women will be found to be that twice as many men have diabetes and diabetes interferes with the ability to use vitamin C effectively. This virus expends vitamin C at an extraordinary rate so any metabolic disadvantage as in diabetes is bad news.

This close relationship with blood sugar and diabetes is illustrated by two things. Firstly, every measure of blood sugar control (blood glucose, HbA1c, insulin levels and sensitivity) is improved by 2 grams of vitamin C a day.3 I cover this in my book Say No to Diabetes. Secondly, if you’ve seen type-1 diabetics, such as Theresa May, with that white ‘button’ on their upper arm, which is the Freestyle Libre glucose monitor, and have one try taking 5 grams of vitamin C and see what happens to your reading. It shoots up. It can’t differentiate between glucose and vitamin C.

Vitamin C is part of my secret formula in my new book The 5-Day Diet which is, not only the fastest and healthiest way to lose weight, but also the quickest way to regain stable blood sugar control and freedom from sugar cravings. Find out more.

References

1. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15930480

2. https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2006-04/foas-vcd040306.php

3. http://www.jmrps.net/eJournals/_eJournals/79_REVIEW%20ARTICLE.pdf

 

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