Can vegans get enough nutrients?

  • 6 May 2017
  • Reading time 2 mins
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There are three key nutrients a vegan diet struggles to provide enough of – vitamin B12, vitamin D and omega-3 fats.

 

 

 

Whether you’ve made a choice to be vegan for health reasons or concern for animal welfare, it can be a challenge to get all the nutrients you need from a vegan diet. This is because there are some nutrients that mainly come from animal food - for example vitamins B12 and D and essential omega 3 fats EPA and DHA. Iron can also be a problem as although it is abundant in beans, it’s easier for your body to use the iron found in meat.

Vitamin B12

 While algae, such as chlorella or spirulina, do contain a B12 like molecule it doesn’t function in the body as B12. The only functional B12 in vegan foods is found in shiitake mushrooms and laver seaweed, as used in Wales to make laver bread. Nori is a type of laver seaweed. Eating these foods or supplementing 10mcg a day is the only option.

 Vitamin D

There are two forms of vitamin D – vitamin D2 is made in plants while D3 is found in animal produce and produced in the skin. Our main source of vitamin D is from sunlight acting on the skin. But you
need to expose your arms and face for at least half an hour a day to make enough.

D3 is marginally more effective than D2 however the D2 used in vegetarian supplements, readily converts to D3 in the body and even D3 in supplements, while not technically ‘vegetarian’ is derived
from the oil in wool.

So if you’re a vegan who doesn’t get enough sunlight as you tend to cover up or live in a cold climate, then Vitamin D is worth supplementing every day, taking in 15mcg or 600iu. In the winter double
this amount may be necessary. The RDA in the UK is 5mcg but Scandinavian countries have increased this to 10mcg.

Omega 3

Omega 3 seed oils are processed by the body from alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) into EPA and DHA which are anti-inflammatory, cardioprotective and help to build the brain. DHA is especially important in pregnancy for development of the baby’s brain.

There are good vegetarian sources of omega-3 including chia seeds and their oil and flax seeds and flax seed oil, both of which contain ALA. However, although ALA has been shown to have positive health benefits in its own right the issue is that not so much ALA converts into the more potent anti-inflammatory EPA, essential for the cardiovascular system and DHA, essential for building the brain.

The good news is that there are now vegetarian supplements, made from algea and seaweed, that provide both DHA and EPA.

Find out more by reading my new report

 

 

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